What to Expect From Dungeons & Dragons’ First Crossover into Magic: The Gathering

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Wizards of the Coast does a great job of conveying a sense of plot and propulsion through the cards. Discovering the depth of thought put into telling that story through the art and flavor text on the cards is one of the subtler joys of the game, and something D&D will likely benefit greatly from.

New Mechanics

In Adventures in the Forgotten Realms, you will find 12 iconic classes from D&D, such as Wizard, Barbarian, and Cleric. And you will be able to upgrade your level on each class to get powerful effects!

AFR is introducing new class enchantments – permanents that players cast, stay on the board, and can be leveled up for a cost to unlock new abilities. So like in a game of D&D, a level one sorcerer enchantment has good utility in its one time loot effect, but leveling it past that makes the sorcerer class extremely powerful, allowing its controller to tap creatures to cast instants or sorceries or hitting opponents with escalating ping damage when that controller casts multiple spells in one turn. 

And the classes aren’t the only addition to gameplay. Pack Tactics is a combat-based ability that provides a benefit to attackers if the sum total of attacking power is over a certain level: like in D&D, attacking gets easier the more attackers there are. This ability will be focused primarily on red and green creatures, and while it and the dungeon mechanic have the ability to change the whole board, there’s one more addition you need to know about.

Many cards in this set will have D&D dice tables for activated abilities. Pay a certain amount of mana, tap the card, or just enter the battlefield to trigger a D20 roll for bonus effects: tap an opponent’s creature if you roll 1-9, or create 2 treasure tokens if you roll a 10-19, or create a tapped attacking copy of the attacking creature if you roll a 14-20 and then roll again. 

The mechanic looks fully supported: there are cards that ping for 1 damage each time a die is rolled, cards that add additional die to each roll, cards that create token creatures when die are rolled. If you’ve ever played a Commander game against a dice deck, you’ll know how much fun that can be: it’s one of the only times I find myself rooting against my own deck, just to see how wild the rolls can turn out. Adventures in the Forgotten Realms is only going to make that more fun.

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  • tap an opponent’s creature if you roll 1-9
  • create 2 treasure tokens if you roll a 10-19
  • create a tapped attacking copy of the attacking creature
  • Dungeons & Dragons: Adventures in the Forgotten Realms
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